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Old 05 December 2009, 19:52   #1
cookstar
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Default Installing air vents in house from scratch?

A friend has asked me to help her get two air vents in her bungalow, now it is brick to the outside and I'm assuming there is a cavity in between the second brick layer? You will have to forgive the terminology - I'm no builder.

Now can I just drill a circle of holes right through both layers and place vents on either side or does the cavity need to be sealed as well?

Any help or advice would be great as I hope to be doing this some time in the coming week.

Cheers.
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Old 05 December 2009, 22:39   #2
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Now can I just drill a circle of holes right through both layers and place vents on either side or does the cavity need to be sealed as well? Cheers.
Hire a core cutter,easier than drilling a series of holes.If your venting through the wall you will have to put in a duct from your inside face right through to the outer wall face otherwise the air will vent into the cavity.
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Old 05 December 2009, 22:45   #3
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Hire a core cutter,easier than drilling a series of holes.If your venting through the wall you will have to put in a duct from your inside face right through to the outer wall face otherwise the air will vent into the cavity.

The actual drilling of the holes isn't a problem, I have the tools and drill bits needed for the job, and last time I looked the core cutters were very expensive to hire.

I just needed to know about the ducting, so assuming I get the two holes out OK, can I put some say 4 inch duct in there and use expanding foam to seal and keep it in place?
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Old 06 December 2009, 00:31   #4
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can I put some say 4 inch duct in there and use expanding foam to seal and keep it in place?
Try and cut your hole as close to 4 inch as you can,you can use flexi ducting or preferably 4 inch sewer pipe.

Then depending on how much gap you have around the pipe fill with silicone (for very little gap),expanding foam (for larger gap).
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Old 06 December 2009, 08:22   #5
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I just needed to know about the ducting, so assuming I get the two holes out OK, can I put some say 4 inch duct in there and use expanding foam to seal and keep it in place?
Correct. Though it will be a far neater job using a core cutter.

Out of interest, why are the vents being fitted? If for Gas Safety reasons their need to be of a certain min size
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Old 06 December 2009, 09:32   #6
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i get alot of condensation in my house even with air vents,but then its a case of more air vents but a colder room as naturally cold air from outside comes thruso cant win

i would suspect the OP is doing the same for condensation reasons ??
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Old 06 December 2009, 11:06   #7
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Do you want square holes, rectangle or round holes?

Another way would be to remove a few bricks, and embed an airbrick into the hole. : http://www.heidelbergcement.com/NR/r..._brick_630.jpg

The cavity is bridged with a sleeve about the same size of the brick/hole itself (usually plastic these days, but you can still get terracotta). Double height airbricks can be installed if need be (might be favourable if the internal brickwork is formed from double height blocks). You can just use expanding foam to seal the cavity instead but I wouldn't (no technical reason, I just think sleaving is neater - and how it would be done if the house were built new).

If you want a round hole; core cutter is teh best way. For the price of renting you can get some cheap TCT cores, although if your drill hasn't got a clutch I wouldn't try it (been there done that, not something I want to do again). However, look at what your cutting/drilling into. 90% of houses have nice soft bricks. But some have hard b*****d bricks. Our area was once once known for brick-making, hence local hand made bricks tend to be a nightmare (purcussion drill - forget it, SDS dill - breaks away the brick faces, core drill - 30mins to 1hr per hole, then the core drill is worn out after 3 holes). If your house does have hard b*****d bricks (not a technical term ) its easier to remove bricks, chilsel to size and repoint them, even if the time taken is about the same. I'm not left with worn out core cutters, a overheated drill and aching arms .

Oh and watch out for cavities filled with polystyrene ***** - can get a bit messy if the beads are not bonded
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Old 06 December 2009, 17:18   #8
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i get alot of condensation in my house even with air vents,but then its a case of more air vents but a colder room as naturally cold air from outside comes thruso cant win

i would suspect the OP is doing the same for condensation reasons ??

Yeah, she suffers from condensation in her house quite badly, and has been told this will solve the problem.
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Old 06 December 2009, 20:33   #9
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Air vents might not cure the problem,you could be letting cold air in and it will be looking to condense on a cool surface.

To stop condensation you need to increase the temperature of the area/walls where the condesation is forming,dry lining,insulation,radiator position is crucial as opposite a window will only cause problems,dpc bridged,you need to find out if its condensation or penetraing damp as well.

There are loads of things to consider before air vents in and i have come across loads on my houses that i have done up and at home.

Have you got any more info on the problems
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Old 07 December 2009, 14:59   #10
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Air vents might not cure the problem,you could be letting cold air in and it will be looking to condense on a cool surface.

To stop condensation you need to increase the temperature of the area/walls where the condesation is forming,dry lining,insulation,radiator position is crucial as opposite a window will only cause problems,dpc bridged,you need to find out if its condensation or penetraing damp as well.

There are loads of things to consider before air vents in and i have come across loads on my houses that i have done up and at home.

Have you got any more info on the problems
Not many more details other than the two companies she had round for a suspected damp issue have both told her that it is not damp, but condensation due to not haveing enough ventilation in her house, and advised her to have two aire vents fitted.
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Old 07 December 2009, 18:04   #11
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I think what you need is a system to draw the condensation out,Vent Axia do one for domestic dwellings I thinks its called loft master.
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Old 07 December 2009, 18:41   #12
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Heat recovery extractor fans are a good solution. You get the air movement and ventilation without the heat loss. You can get small 4-inch heat recovery fans.

The loft mounted units with ducting are fantastic bits of kits and decent ones have a heat recovery function on them. Xpelair have some details on their website.
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Old 07 December 2009, 19:29   #13
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All the latter ideas are sounding expensive ???
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Old 09 December 2009, 13:26   #14
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Good job it is a bungalow Using a core cutter while on a ladder sucks when you don't like heights...

I will be using a LapVent in the future to see how good they work. You fit these from inside your loft
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Old 09 December 2009, 13:26
 
 
 
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air, bricks, brickwork, cavity, circle, gas, heater, holes, house, houses, inch, installing, side, vent, vents


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